John Grindrod: In today’s world, with travel comes selfies

 John Grindrod: In today’s world, with travel comes selfies


As we are about to return to the lunar calendar page where traditional travel becomes more frequent, I have a question for you. When was the last time you traveled that didn’t include taking a selfie? My guess is, no matter what your age, it’s been a long time.

With the improvement in photographic quality of today’s cell phones, something that was once mandatory for almost all travelers, a camera, can no longer find its way into many bags. Now, that phone that we always have with us, you know, the ones that we never stop tapping, ready to take the right picture at the right angle that will shock and amaze everyone, especially everyone. those Twitter followers and Facebook friends.

When Lady Jane and I decided to go out and look at parts of our world that were very different from the place we call home, I was the one who pressed that little white button every now and then to get a kadiyot. While most of what I take pictures of is nature scenery (I am, as Jane will tell you, a sucker of fallen surf and autumn trees dripping gold and red), I think we should to show up sometimes, not for social-media posting, mind you, but just for our own reflection on the days when our lives in Ohio seemed a bit of a change.

Thanks to the wonders of the tech world in which we live, my photos are automatically loaded on the iPad to create a larger image. Gone are the days when I would go to Meijer to develop photos unless there was an occasion when I wanted to frame for the girl from Montezuma.

Now, when selfies are discussed, of course, it’s usually a hit-or-miss proposition when both Jane and my face are properly aligned and centered. If you think one of those selfie sticks is a purchase I would consider, well, I don’t, unless it has someone to take it with! As for asking other fellow foreigners to take Jane and my image, well, I have a rule. Unless someone asks me to take a photo of him first, thus, allowing me to play the reciprocity card, I will never impose special occasions on other people.

Now, one box that I always check when it comes to any photo efforts on my travels, whether straight scenery or selfies with my girlfriend, is the safety box. We have been fortunate to have seen some amazing natural beauty over the years, mostly from vantage points from high.

In places like the Cliffs of Moher in County Clare in Ireland, the South Rim of the Grand Canyon and many sights on State Route 1 away from the Pacific coast of Northern California and many more, I saw my companions to travel better. near the edge of the drops a few hundred feet to capture an image. Anyone who has had experiences at such altitudes knows that in addition to altitude, there is always a sudden and strong gust of wind.

In our advanced photography seasons, many have taken a step too far to get the best shot. The Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care conducted its own study and found that 259 deaths occurred between 2011 and 2017 that were due to people dying while trying to take a poorly conceptual photograph.

In Arizona’s Horseshoe Bend, which is the eastern edge of the Grand Canyon overlooking the serpentine bends of the Colorado River far below, there were two selfie-related deaths in 2018 just a few months away. .

In 2019 in an article in The Irish Post, author Aidan Lonergan wrote about a Trinity College Dublin student who fell to his death on the Cliffs of Moher while trying to take a selfie about 700 feet above the surf crashing against the rocky shores of the Atlantic. Sadly he didn’t respect the altitude and the usual 30-plus mile-an-hour rush that accompanies the majesty of what can be seen. And, of course, in Ireland, almost everything travelers see can come with some rain.

When Jane and I were there, we both saw and heard the words of the memorial on the way to The Cliffs that read, “In Memory of those Who Have Lost Their Lives at the Cliffs of Moher” in English and Irish and enjoyed . our moments of admiring what is beneath us are safe.

Yes, the traditional travel season is here with us, and there are many natural wonders to imbibe, especially in national parks. Some come with my strong recommendations, such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce Canyon and Yosemite, but with the beautiful scenery available for visual retrieval stored in memory banks, there are also comes as a potential danger for people who are unable to conceptualize. the weakness of life.

When Jane and I were there, we both saw and heard the words of the memorial on the way to The Cliffs that read, “In Memory of those Who Have Lost Their Lives at the Cliffs of Moher” in English and Irish and enjoyed . our moments of admiring what is beneath us are safe.

John Grindrod is a regular columnist at The Lima News, a freelance writer and editor and the author of two books. Reach him at [email protected]





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