The impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of college students

 The impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of college students



People were shown the COVID-19 testing site at the Curative kiosk outside the Memorial Student Center on the Prairie View A&M University campus Monday, Jan.  24, 2022 in Prairie View, Texas.

People were shown the COVID-19 testing site at the Curative kiosk outside the Memorial Student Center on the Prairie View A&M University campus Monday, Jan. 24, 2022 in Prairie View, Texas.

Photo file

Stress, sadness, anxiety, loneliness. I am a student whose mental health has been affected by all the struggles due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In a world where human connection and communication are essential for students to learn and grow as individuals, it is sadly stripped away only to leave uncertainty and despair. I want to be a voice for U.S. college students and provide solutions that have helped me with my mental health as a student during the pandemic as well as teach what colleges and universities need to know.

According to a survey conducted by activeminds.org, “80 percent of college students report that COVID-19 negatively affects their mental health.” Since the pandemic first developed in December of 2019, students have not been aware of the services their universities can provide them with mental health services. “More than 55 percent of students say they don’t know where to go if they or someone they know needs mental health services.” Most Connecticut college campuses lack the resources, offering TED talks and old-fashioned advocacy videos that provide little connection to the audience. Counseling services are also limited by the number of sessions you can attend and there are always not enough counselors available. These resources should be unlimited and always available.

Students will benefit from programs such as virtual and personal group therapy sessions and weekly check-in. Educating professors and staff in many areas about mental health will also prepare colleges and universities across the U.S. for the future as we see the devastating impact on mental health due to the pandemic. Programs like these can give students the support they need, a sense of empathy, validation and understanding of what they are experiencing in addition to the outdated resources on their college and university webpages.

In addition to these changes that can be implemented, there are many self-care techniques that have helped me as a student and are recommended for students struggling through this difficult time. Having a routine, reducing time online, spending time having fun, engaging in physical activity, keeping away from news and social media are all good ways to release pandemic-related stress. These practices alone can help and have been proven to reduce stress and anxiety. Your voice and advocacy can be one step closer to improving the mental health resources and resources specifically associated with the COVID-19 pandemic being implemented in colleges and universities across the United States.

Josephine Toni is a student at Southern Connecticut State University.



Source link

Related post