Traveling while COVID positive: What to do if it happens

 Traveling while COVID positive: What to do if it happens


According to the U.S. Travel Association, 35% of Americans expect to travel more this summer than last summer.  That means the risk of getting sick while traveling is definitely a possibility.

According to the U.S. Travel Association, 35% of Americans expect to travel more this summer than last summer. That means the risk of getting sick while traveling is definitely a possibility.

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Travel to the United States and abroad is back in full motion despite COVID-19 still to come.

With millions of passengers flying each year, Charlotte Douglas International Airport is the sixth most active airport in the United States. About six in 10 Americans plan to travel at least once this summer, according to data from the U.S. Travel Association.

Of those planning vacations, 35% of Americans expect to travel more this summer than last year. That means the risk of getting sick while traveling is definitely a possibility.

COVID-19 bans are weakened at most U.S. airports and public transportation hubs. However, to enter the U.S. from foreign countries, passengers must provide proof that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the past three months or provide a negative test result within a day of travel, according to at the CDC.

If you get infected while traveling abroad, you will find it difficult to be quarantined in a foreign country.

Here are some tips for avoiding and preparing for the worst case scenario:

Plan first

Preparing for what could possibly happen if you test positive for COVID-19 is the best way to dispel a distressing situation. Continuing to be informed of the laws, policies and protocols related to COVID-19 at your destination will help move forward for unintended consequences.

The U.S. State Department website urges travelers to make a plan if they become infected with COVID-19 while traveling.

“This includes being willing to cover additional living costs, flight ticket replacement fees, and any other additional costs they may incur due to the unexpected extension,” the Department wrote in writing. State.

Check for COVID-19 available accommodation

Even if some U.S. cities offer discounted accommodation for infected travelers, domestic options are declining as COVID-19 bans in the United States are lifted. Some international hotels and resorts are offering discounted prices to travelers in need of quarantine, USA Today reports.

Put the COVID-19 tests in your luggage

Packing a COVID test for longer trips is a great way to avoid putting yourself and others at risk. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, unused test kits are allowed to carry and inspected luggage.

Invest in travel insurance

One way to prevent the financial burden of an unexpected trip extension is travel insurance. Keep in mind that not all insurance companies still provide protection against pandemic -related incidents. Read carefully what is available before your trip.

Choose your airlines wisely

You can prevent a chaotic situation at the airport by booking your flight with an airline that allows free trip cancellation and free rescheduling. Airlines like Delta and United allow passengers to be flexible with their travel dates.

Evan Santiago is a Charlotte Observer reporter who writes for the Service Journalism Desk of the publication. She hails from New York City and is now based in Queen City where she works to help local readers navigate the challenges that come with everyday life in the modern world.





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